Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home1/keckist/public_html/energy/wp-content/plugins/facebook-likes-you/facebook-likes-you.php:2) in /home1/keckist/public_html/energy/wp-includes/feed-rss2.php on line 8
eenergys.com http://energy.keckist.edu.np Mon, 04 Jun 2012 15:50:35 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.0.1 Likes Us on Facebook http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2012/05/19/likes-us-on-facebook/ http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2012/05/19/likes-us-on-facebook/#comments Sat, 19 May 2012 06:44:18 +0000 eenergys. http://energy.keckist.edu.np/?p=966 www.facebook.com/eenergys

]]>

www.facebook.com/eenergys

]]>
http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2012/05/19/likes-us-on-facebook/feed/ 0
We are moving to www.eenergys.com http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/09/21/we-are-moving-to-www-eenergys-com/ http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/09/21/we-are-moving-to-www-eenergys-com/#comments Wed, 21 Sep 2011 16:48:05 +0000 eenergys. http://energy.keckist.edu.np/?p=953 Dear Readers, We would like to inform that there will be no further updates in this website. Our business page will be available in Facebook http://www.facebook.com/eenergys. Please have patience and we apologize if this has occurred problems in this run.

Thanking you, eenergys.com Team

]]>

Dear Readers,
We would like to inform that there will be no further updates in this website. Our business page will be available in Facebook http://www.facebook.com/eenergys. Please have patience and we apologize if this has occurred problems in this run.

Thanking you,
eenergys.com Team

]]>
http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/09/21/we-are-moving-to-www-eenergys-com/feed/ 0
Himalayantimes Daily Newspaper, 28 August 2011, Nepal http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/08/28/the-himalayantimes-daily-newspaper-of-nepal_28-august-2011/ http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/08/28/the-himalayantimes-daily-newspaper-of-nepal_28-august-2011/#comments Sun, 28 Aug 2011 04:09:57 +0000 eenergys. http://energy.keckist.edu.np/?p=942 Valley Suited to Windmills

http://www.thehimalayantimes.com/fullNews.php?headline=Valley+suited+to+windmills%3A+Report&NewsID=300821

]]>
Valley Suited to Windmills

http://www.thehimalayantimes.com/fullNews.php?headline=Valley+suited+to+windmills%3A+Report&NewsID=300821

]]>
http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/08/28/the-himalayantimes-daily-newspaper-of-nepal_28-august-2011/feed/ 0
Kathmandu Valley – Wind Power http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/08/25/kathmandu-valley-wind-power-2/ http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/08/25/kathmandu-valley-wind-power-2/#comments Thu, 25 Aug 2011 02:07:04 +0000 eenergys. http://energy.keckist.edu.np/?p=934 SWETA POKHAREL Baseline and Feasibility Study by Mirlung Electro-Mech Concern (MEC), 24 August 2011 Kathmandu valley is facing enormous energy crisis from the past years. The tendency of crisis is rising due to the government upheaval and exaggerated plans leading to failures one after the other. This entails us to think from a wider perspective and make [...]]]> SWETA POKHAREL

Baseline and Feasibility Study by Mirlung Electro-Mech Concern (MEC), 24 August 2011
Kathmandu valley is facing enormous energy crisis from the past years. The tendency of crisis is rising due to the government upheaval and exaggerated plans leading to failures one after the other. This entails us to think from a wider perspective and make use of the renewable energy like wind power. The valley has high wind energy feasible site which can be addressed by mentioning the two immensely windy, bordering hills on the west and east sides. The energy crisis of the country can be addressed apparently by choosing to enter a fully fledged wind power generation. The mini grid is available to every places and corners of the valley. The hills situated in those certain points of the valley have high feasible site of wind power generation. If wind turbines are placed in the neighboring hills surrounding the valley, the losses will be minimized in comparison to the context of remote areas. It will be both technically and financially feasible in case of its application in the valley. There is also an access to transportation in the neighboring hills of Kathmandu valley. This suggests the government to understand the potential sites and implement in them.

Wind power projects are the quickest while compared to other energy projects and therefore are the most suitable for a country like Nepal which is in the verse of development. The most interesting feature is that 20MW wind power generation can be produced within a short period of 3 months and that itself could be a major accomplishment for the valley. This suggests the necessity for the government to also initiate as soon as possible to overcome energy crisis. The valley requires 30% of hydropower annually but a hydropower project does not fit into the valley or its surroundings due to its complexity in location and other requirements. At the present, the Bagmati river which is situated in the valley is not suitable for a hydropower project. But wind power can be generated from the surrounding hills which are Makwanpur, Laakuri Bhanjyaang, Naagdhunga, Bhimdhunga, Nagarkot, Godawari and Phulchowki. This will eventually make Kathmandu , Lalitpur and Bhaktapur a model city from the wind power perspective.

Wind power has similar criteria as that of a hydropower in case of site location. It cannot be installed anywhere without prior survey and baseline study which required manifolds of study, basically documentation and site survey. The study is made on the basis of monthly mean wind speed data, annual mean wind speed data and wind speed distribution data of the feasible site. A minimal wind velocity can occur anywhere but we have to find such a place where there will be presence of high but constant or regular wind speed. Mirlung Electro-Mech Concern(MEC) has already done pre-feasibility and feasibility study around the surrounding hills of Kathmandu valley that have the above quality that sustains a technically and financially feasible wind power projects.

People have the tendency to compare on the basis of cost but not in terms of the duration. The cost of each 1MW wind project will be around 150 million which is same as compared to a hydro project of similar size. The duration of an installation of a wind project is far less which is mere 3 months compared to a hydro project which can be 2 years and more. Any project is successful if it works time-oriented. Nepal possesses much more areas in the terai, hills and himalayas besides the Kathmandu valley itself.

Every part of the valley can be distributed in many ways and certain requirements are met and are kept at levels of priorities. In this way each part will be distributed with pockets of wind energy which brings sustainability into the picture. The lengthiest part of a project is its construction which cannot be predicted by anyone. Even though it is estimated, it cannot be completed with an exact time limit. This is due to many impacts of the country such as social, political, economic, environmental being the first few. A wind project can be completed in 3 months to 12 months time and it has a positive aspect of its feasible practices all around the world. Even our neighboring countries India and China have been benefitted by it to a greater level. China ranks itself as the world’s second largest in the wind power generation while India is in the fifth. Therefore this implies that the Nepalese government should also implement in wind power projects.

]]>
http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/08/25/kathmandu-valley-wind-power-2/feed/ 15
Driving Renewable Energy http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/06/19/driving-renewable-energy/ http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/06/19/driving-renewable-energy/#comments Sun, 19 Jun 2011 10:39:02 +0000 eenergys. http://energy.keckist.edu.np/?p=834 SWETA POKHAREL

“The harnessing and implementation of renewable energy brings sustainable practices around the world. It is evident that there is always a decline in the non-renewable energy source as we use a bit of it every day. In order to maintain a balanced way of life, the renewable energy should be used along with the [...]]]> SWETA POKHAREL

“The harnessing and implementation of renewable energy brings sustainable practices around the world. It is evident that there is always a decline in the non-renewable energy source as we use a bit of it every day. In order to maintain a balanced way of life, the renewable energy should be used along with the non-renewable energy. The production and use of these sources should be made to the maximum. This is a global issue which implies to and becomes a priority for every nation. The developed countries have given their utmost privilege to the fulfillment of the basic needs and amenities to every individual where as the developing countries are in the struggle phase,” says Mr. Amrit Singh Thapa (Wind Energy Specialist).

Nepal being a developing country facing political turbulence is assumed to be a minority in the case of bringing the renewable resource use to a greater level. The Nepalese government is unable to take the initiative to empower wind and solar energy generation as a basic renewable source of energy even in the state of crisis. This is the case of the country’s political but not the geographical scenario. The country which is profited by a topographical hierarchy suggests its ability to bring renewable sources of energy into a new level. Wind and solar energy which can tap electricity and renew as per necessity have the maximum ability to change the daily economic status of the people. “The villages of the hills and terai can benefit from the renewable energy usage and the community will generate income for a sustainable living,” says Thapa.

Wind and solar energy are the main renewable resources which can be co-related with other renewable technologies. It creates a hybrid system that can be practiced in areas of the country with contexts which are the most feasible. This will eventually drive the country towards development from the renewable energy aspect.

]]> http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/06/19/driving-renewable-energy/feed/ 24
Renewable Energy Village in Nawalparasi http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/06/12/renewable-energy-village-in-nawalparasi/ http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/06/12/renewable-energy-village-in-nawalparasi/#comments Sun, 12 Jun 2011 06:53:15 +0000 eenergys. http://energy.keckist.edu.np/?p=807 SWETA POKHAREL

In the present context, the urban areas of the country have been facing load shedding of 16 hours. In such scenario, Mirlung Electro-Mech Concern (MEC) has met the rural area Beshar Danda, Nawalparasi District with renewable sources by commencing the project on Wind and solar Hybrid System. Most of the terrain of hills and [...]]]> SWETA POKHAREL

In the present context, the urban areas of the country have been facing load shedding of 16 hours. In such scenario, Mirlung Electro-Mech Concern (MEC) has met the rural area Beshar Danda, Nawalparasi District with renewable sources by commencing the project on Wind and solar Hybrid System. Most of the terrain of hills and terai of Nepal has large wind and solar resource. Thus the combination of the two technologies, solar in the day and wind in the night brings 24 hours of electricity making it a natural and affordable source. Such projects can be completed within 15 to 30 days and is a boon for the developing country facing development issues. In addition other similar projects have been undertaken by MEC in different parts of the country. MEC also plans to rectify the energy crisis of the urban areas by implementation of such renewable resources.

The positive aspect of the site and its location is the 24 hours wind availability. The availability of wind is basically from N-S direction in the morning and S-N direction in the afternoon, continuously from 5 pm to 8 am. This is the best aspect of the site because in this time period the maximum usage of electricity is made in every household. The weekly average of 22 hours would generate full capacity power generation. Similarly, the availability of solar is 4-4.5 hours after 12 pm which varies slightly according to season. In case solar is not available wind generated power could be directly distributed.

The adjustments were made for 6 houses which never had the privilege of electricity before. The distribution of power in each household is 100 watt. The villagers were overwhelmed with the fact that electricity was made available to them by the renewable sources.

The available energy of wind and solar is a sustainable resource for this location. This implies that a renewable project is successful only if it is sustainable.

For Feedback:
Sweta Pokharel (abbunu@gmail.com)

]]> http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2011/06/12/renewable-energy-village-in-nawalparasi/feed/ 288
UK opens world’s largest offshore wind farm http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/09/23/uk-opens-worlds-largest-offshore-wind-farm/ http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/09/23/uk-opens-worlds-largest-offshore-wind-farm/#comments Thu, 23 Sep 2010 16:12:34 +0000 eenergys. http://energy.keckist.edu.np/?p=738 Published: September 23, 2010 The world’s largest offshore wind farm off Thanet in Kent is to start producing electricity.

Construction started a year ago at the £780m wind farm, which can be seen from the coast on a clear day, and is expected to generate enough electricity for 240,000 homes.

With the 300 MW Thanet Offshore Wind [...]]]> Published: September 23, 2010

The world’s largest offshore wind farm off Thanet in Kent is to start producing electricity.

Construction started a year ago at the £780m wind farm, which can be seen from the coast on a clear day, and is expected to generate enough electricity for 240,000 homes.

With the 300 MW Thanet Offshore Wind Farm on line today, following the opening of an extension to the onshore Crystal Rig earlier this month, the UK has hit 5 GW installed capacity, says RenewableUK.

London, UK Crystal Rig’s capacity climbed from 138 MW up to 200 MW on 8 September, which – along with the commissioning today of the world’s largest operating offshore farm – helped the UK add its fifth gigawatt of installed wind capacity in less than 12 months, said the trade body.
Wind energy in particular is not alternative energy any longer – it is absolutely mainstream — Maria McCaffery, chief executive, RenewableUK

The acceleration in capacity growth to hit the 5 GW target was welcomed by RenewableUK’s CEO Maria McCaffery.

“Renewable energy generally and wind energy in particular is not alternative energy any longer – it is absolutely mainstream,” she said.

In addition to its 5 GW in operation, the UK has nearly 18 GW of wind capacity either consented, in construction or in the planning system, according to RenewableUK.

With the UK’s portion of electricity from renewables now close to 10%, up from about 2% back in 2002, the government’s targets for hitting 20% by 2020 are “realistic and achievable”, said McCaffery.

Wind in the UK now provides enough electricity for almost 3 million homes, said the organisation.

Thanet Offshore Wind Farm is a Vattenfall project while Crystal Rig and its extension, Crystal Rig II, was developed by Fred. Olsen Renewables.

]]> http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/09/23/uk-opens-worlds-largest-offshore-wind-farm/feed/ 67
Wind/PV with Diesel hybrid sytem http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/09/04/windpvdiesel-hybrid-where-electricity-is-not-available/ http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/09/04/windpvdiesel-hybrid-where-electricity-is-not-available/#comments Sat, 04 Sep 2010 04:52:24 +0000 eenergys. http://energy.keckist.edu.np/?p=713 AMRIT SINGH THAPA

where electricity is not available

Combination of renewable source of energy such as wind/solar with diesel generator appears to find increasing appeal in implementing decentralized electricity generations system for remote places of Nepal. The addition of diesel generator to the renewable source of energy provides power on demand, improves reliability and reduces the initial [...]]]> AMRIT SINGH THAPA

where electricity is not available

Combination of renewable source of energy such as wind/solar with diesel generator appears to find increasing appeal in implementing decentralized electricity generations system for remote places of Nepal. The addition of diesel generator to the renewable source of energy provides power on demand, improves reliability and reduces the initial cost of the hybrid plant. Similarly, renewable source of energy addition to a conventional fossil fuel operating diesel generator reduces fuel consumption, thus improving the economics and environmental attributes of the power source. This system can be applied to various geographical conditions, mountain hills, island, plain areas or remote areas, where electricity is not available.

A review of the overall energy production and utilization as well as the system performance of Wind and Solar PV hybrid system in Nepal indicates the promising potential of such system in the coming days.

]]> http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/09/04/windpvdiesel-hybrid-where-electricity-is-not-available/feed/ 53
U.S. Energy Use Declines, Renewables Increase http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/08/27/u-s-energy-use-declines-renewables-increase/ http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/08/27/u-s-energy-use-declines-renewables-increase/#comments Fri, 27 Aug 2010 03:26:03 +0000 eenergys. http://energy.keckist.edu.np/?p=699 California — A new government study shows that Americans are using less energy overall and making more use of renewable energy resources.

The United States used significantly less coal and petroleum in 2009 than in 2008, and significantly more wind power. There also was a decline in natural gas use and increases in solar, hydro [...]]]> US energy-use-declines-while-renewables-increase
California — A new government study shows that Americans are using less energy overall and making more use of renewable energy resources.

The United States used significantly less coal and petroleum in 2009 than in 2008, and significantly more wind power. There also was a decline in natural gas use and increases in solar, hydro and geothermal power according to the most recent energy flow charts released by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory(www.llnl.gov).

“Energy use tends to follow the level of economic activity, and that level declined last year. At the same time, higher efficiency appliances and vehicles reduced energy use even further,” said A.J. Simon, an LLNL energy systems analyst who develops the energy flow charts using data provided by the Department of Energy’s Energy Information Administration. “As a result, people and businesses are using less energy in general.”

The estimated U.S. energy use in 2009 equaled 94.6 quadrillion BTUs (“quads”), down from 99.2 quadrillion BTUs in 2008. (A BTU or British Thermal Unit is a unit of measurement for energy, and is equivalent to about 1.055 kilojoules). The average American household uses about 95 million BTU per year.

Energy use in the residential, commercial, industrial and transportation arenas all declined by .22, .09, 2.16 and .88 quads, respectively.

Wind power increased dramatically in 2009 to.70 quads of primary energy compared to .51 in 2008. Most of that energy is tied directly to electricity generation and thus helps decrease the use of coal for electricity production.

“The increase in renewables is a really good story, especially in the wind arena,” Simon said. “It’s a result of very good incentives and technological advancements. In 2009, the technology got better and the incentives remained relatively stable. The investments put in place for wind in previous years came online in 2009. Even better, there are more projects in the pipeline for 2010 and beyond.”

The significant decrease in coal used to produce electricity can be attributed to three factors: overall lower electricity demand, a fuel shift to natural gas, and an offset created by more wind power production, according to Simon.

Nuclear energy use remained relatively flat in 2009. No new plants were added or taken offline in this interval, and the existing fleet operated slightly less than in 2008.

Of the 94.6 quads consumed, only 39.97 ended up as energy services. Energy services, such as lighting and machinery output, are harder to estimate than fuel consumption, Simon said.

The ratio of energy services to the total amount of energy used is a measure of the country’s energy efficiency.

Carbon emissions data are expected to be released later this year, but Simon suspects they will tell a similar story.

“The reduction in the use of natural gas, coal and petroleum is commensurate with a reduction in carbon emissions,” he said. “Simply said, people are doing less stuff. Therefore, they’re burning less fuel.”

Published: August 26, 2010
Source: http://www.renewableenergyworld.com

]]> http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/08/27/u-s-energy-use-declines-renewables-increase/feed/ 222
Can fuel cells power the future? http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/08/24/can-fuel-cells-power-the-future/ http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/08/24/can-fuel-cells-power-the-future/#comments Tue, 24 Aug 2010 04:49:12 +0000 eenergys. http://energy.keckist.edu.np/?p=693 Alan Boyle writes:An electricity-generating fuel-cell system known as the Bloom Box sparked a huge buzz in the energy debate six months ago – and since then, still more ventures have surfaced to promise better living through chemistry. Will future fuel cells make good on those promises? We should know in the next couple of years. One [...]]]> home brewed solar energy systems for powering homes and plug in cars
Alan Boyle writes:An electricity-generating fuel-cell system known as the Bloom Box sparked a huge buzz in the energy debate six months ago – and since then, still more ventures have surfaced to promise better living through chemistry. Will future fuel cells make good on those promises? We should know in the next couple of years.

One of the concepts, detailed today at an American Chemical Society meeting in Boston, combines the environmental friendliness of solar power with the 24/7 capability of fuel-cell generation. When the sun shines, electricity from solar panels would feed into a personal power grid, and also split water into hydrogen and oxygen. When the sun isn’t out, the hydrogen and oxygen can be recombined to keep the electricity flowing, producing pure water in the process.

“Our goal is to make each home its own power system,” Daniel Nocera, a chemist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, explained in a news release discussing the system. “We’re working toward development of ‘personalized’ energy units that can be manufactured, distributed and installed inexpensively. There certainly are major obstacles to be overcome – existing fuel cells and solar cells must be improved, for instance. Nevertheless, one can envision villages in India and Africa not long from now purchasing an affordable basic system.”

Nocera and his colleagues started out with the water-splitting side of the equation. They found a more efficient way to convert H2O into hydrogen and oxygen, using relatively inexpensive catalysts that contain cobalt and nickel. And it doesn’t need to be pure H2O. “Owing to the self-healing properties of the catalysts, these electrolyzers can use any water source,” including seawater, waste water or water from the Charles River in Boston, the researchers say.

They contend that their system eliminates the need for expensive platinum catalysts – which would make the economics of fuel cells much more attractive. Prototype water-splitting systems have been built at a cost of $30 each, operating at power levels of 100 watts. The ACS news release says the catalytic system has been licensed to Sun Catalytix, an MIT commercial spin-off, and the venture aims to make super-efficient electrolyzers available for homes and small businesses within two years.

As Nocera noted, the big issues surrounding this system have to do with the costs for the other components: Putting solar panels on your home could cost tens of thousands of dollars, although government subsidies can reduce the price dramatically. In order to get Nocera’s make-it-yourself electricity system out to villages in the developing world, the devices to turn the hydrogen into energy would also have to become cheaper and more efficient.

The Bloom Box is just one of the devices that has generated excitement among energy experts. It’s generated electricity as well, in pilot projects at places ranging from eBay to Safeway. Bloom Energy’s 100-kilowatt “server” converts natural gas and air into electricity, producing water and carbon dioxide in the process (CH4+2O2 is turned into 2H2O+CO2).

There are still a couple of worrisome factors about that equation, however: First, the Bloom Box is powered by natural gas. The energy conversion factor (50 percent efficiency or better) compares with the best rates for gas-fired power plants, but it’s still a fossil fuel. There are still carbon dioxide emissions as well, although the carbon footprint is not as great as it would be for a gas-fired plant.

Wyoming-based NDCPower is working on a different approach: It’s developing fuel cells that could take in biofuels – say, ethanol, methanol, butanol or even biodiesel that’s converted to alcohol – and produce chemicals with industrial applications on the other side, along with the electricity.

“Our technology is the only existing technology that allows you to take a carbon-based fuel and make energy, and produce no CO2,” the company’s president and chief executive officer, Don Montgomery, told me during a recent sitdown.

The byproducts could range from acetic acid (which is used to make plastics and currently costs $400 a ton or more) to formic acid (a silage preservative that’s even more expensive). Montgomery figures that the sale of chemicals produced by the NDCPower fuel cells, plus the no-CO2 angle, could win them some extra attention in the developing fuel-cell marketplace.

The key is in the chemicals used to make the fuel conversion – a recipe that Montgomery and his colleagues aren’t talking publicly about, except in the broadest terms. “You basically take your ethanol and pour it into Dran-O,” he joked. Dan Buttry, a chemistry professor at Arizona State University who also serves as NDCPower’s chief technology officer, would say only that the secret ingredient is “not platinum.”

Buttry also told me that the NDCPower fuel cell doesn’t need a membrane – which is a plus, because in most fuel cells, the membrane “is a pretty big component of the cost.”

Right now, NDCPower’s main business is providing military-grade power systems to the, um, U.S. military. But the company is aiming to make its mark in the civilian power market as well. And that market is just getting revved up. “The development curve has been like stepping on a rocket ship,” Montgomery told me.

Fuel-cell technology isn’t quite ready to reach orbit yet, and there are some big questions yet to be answered: Will the increased efficiency make up for the higher cost of fuel-cell devices? What’s the right scale for fuel cells? Will we want to have a fuel cell in every garage (or in every hand, or every pacemaker), or does it make more sense to have big fuel-cell “servers” in office buildings or next-generation power plants? What’ll it take to get to the vision of a “power plant in every home,” as sketched out today by MIT’s Nocera.

source from: http://www.msnbc.msn.com

]]>
http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/08/24/can-fuel-cells-power-the-future/feed/ 136