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eenergys.com » Nepalese Wind Turbine http://energy.keckist.edu.np Mon, 04 Jun 2012 15:50:35 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.0.1 Wind Energy Scenario in Mustang http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/03/23/wind-energy-scenario-in-mustang/ http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/03/23/wind-energy-scenario-in-mustang/#comments Tue, 23 Mar 2010 18:11:11 +0000 eenergys. http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2010/03/23/wind-energy-scenario-in-mustang/ AMRIT SINGH THAPA Mustang District is one of the favourite tourist destination of Nepal. So the demand of electricity for this region is very high. People in this area still depend upon traditional energy resources; such as firewood kerosene and other petroleum products to fulfill the energy demand except in some potential places where solar and [...]]]> AMRIT SINGH THAPA
way to Muktinath Temple, Kagbeni Height, Mustand District of Nepal
Mustang District is one of the favourite tourist destination of Nepal. So the demand of electricity for this region is very high. People in this area still depend upon traditional energy resources; such as firewood kerosene and other petroleum products to fulfill the energy demand except in some potential places where solar and micro hydropower in use for the lightning purposes. In this context it should be noted that Mustang is one of the high wind energy potential areas of Nepal.

Based on the wind data of Mustang district collected by AEPC, the wind velocity at hub height of 20 m was recorded as 75 m/s at maximum. This is the highest wind velocity recorded at any place in Nepal till date. According to the SWERA (Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment in Nepal) report prepared by AEPC, the annual average wind power density (WPD) of Mustang District is 332 watt/m2. Wind power density less than or equal to 100 Watt/m2 are not useful for wind energy harnessing. WPD greater than 200 Watt/m2 are normally taken for consideration for non grid connected power generation while greater than 300 Watt/m2 are considered as grid connectivity wind energy in developing countries. The analysis shows area above 300 Watt/m2 composed of 30 sq km and with 5 MW installed per sq km, yields 150 MW.

These areas have been calculated on a conservative basis so that the exploitable area for wind energy can be increased by covering greater area from the national grid and especially analyzed in specific areas with greater wind energy potential.

Studies have shown that there is high potential for wind power generation in the Mustang district, small wind turbine systems of 1500 watt could be easily installed to electrify the area without long-term data. Wind Power System would help in conservation of environment and forest by reducing carbon emissions thereby making the area pollution free. Wind energy can be used to provide electricity for the people and Mustang would be a model village that uses sustainable power generation through wind energy.

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Wind energy must be key climate change solution http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2009/12/20/wind-energy-must-be-key-climate-change-solution/ http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2009/12/20/wind-energy-must-be-key-climate-change-solution/#comments Sat, 19 Dec 2009 19:14:10 +0000 eenergys. http://energy.keckist.edu.np/2009/12/20/wind-energy-must-be-key-climate-change-solution/ Climate change is now generally accepted to be the greatest environmental threat facing the world, and keeping our planet’s temperature at sustainable levels has become one of the major concerns of policy makers. The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change projects that average temperatures around the world will increase by up to 5.8°C over the [...]]]> windpowerofnepal@hotmail.com
Climate change is now generally accepted to be the greatest environmental threat facing the world, and keeping our planet’s temperature at sustainable levels has become one of the major concerns of policy makers. The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change projects that average temperatures around the world will increase by up to 5.8°C over the coming century. This is predicted to result in a wide range of climate shifts, including melting ice caps, flooding of low-lying land, storms, droughts and violent changes in weather patterns.

One of the main messages from the Nobel Prize winning IPCC’s 4th Assessment Report released in 2007 was that in order to avoid the worst ravages of climate change, global greenhouse gas emissions must peak and begin to decline before 2020.

While the power sector is far from being the only culprit when it comes to climate change, it is the largest single source of emissions, accounting for about 40% of CO2 emissions, and about 25% of overall emissions. The options for making major emissions reductions in the power sector between now and 2020 are basically three: energy efficiency and conservation; fuel switching from coal to gas; and renewable energy, primarily wind power.

Wind power does not emit any climate change inducing carbon dioxide nor other air pollutants which are polluting the major cities of the world and costing billions in additional health costs and infrastructure damage. Within three to six months of operation, a wind turbine has offset all emissions caused by its construction, to run virtually carbon free for the remainder of its 20 year life. Further, in an increasingly carbon-constrained world, wind power is risk-free insurance against the long term downside of carbon intense investments.

Given the crucial timeframe up to 2020 during which global emission must start to decline, the speed of deployment of wind farms is of key importance in combating climate change. Building a conventional power plant can take 10 or 12 years or more, and until it is completed, no power is being generated. Wind power deployment is measured in months, and a half completed wind farm is just a smaller power plant, starting to generate power and income as soon as the first turbines are connected to the grid.

The global wind industry has set itself a target of saving 1.5 billion tons of CO2 per year by 2020, which would amount to a total of 10 billion tons saved in this period. See Global Wind 2008 Outlook for GWEC’s scenarios of wind energy development up to 2050.

While developments in 2008 show that the sector is well on track to meeting this target, a strong global signal from governments is needed to show that they are serious about moving away from fossil fuels and protecting the climate.
As positive outcome to the climate negotiations throughout this year, resulting in a new global agreement in Copenhagen in December, is of fundamental importance and will send the kind of signal that the industry, investors and the finance sector need for wind power to reach its full potential.

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